LoRaWAN with LoPy and KPN + Loggly

 Gepubliceerd door om 15:49  Hardware, LoRaWAN
mei 202017
 

In the Netherlands, KPN was the first to offer nationwide coverage of a IoT network based on LoRaWAN. You can read about my first tests using their Network in combination with the Marvin node in this post. Unlike with the IoT network that for example is currently being rolled out by T-Mobile, which uses NB-IoT and different hardware than The Things Network (TTN), switching a device from the TTN network to the KPN network is simple: just change the DEV_ADDR, NWK_SWKEY, APP_SWKEY values in the config.py of you Pycom LoPy to the values that are provided in the management environment of KPN (see image left). No changes in the microPython code needed. You could even have a device connect to both networks and switch between them (although you probably don’t want to do that when you’ve got a battery powered node).

KPN offers a free test period where you can test your nodes on their infrastructure without having to pay. It is what I used for my train trip last month where I used both the Marvin node (connected to KPN) and the LoPy (connected to TTN) as a way to get a feel for coverage while moving in the Netherlands.

Besides the fact that KPN offers a commercial solution, the free test version (don’t know about the paid version) has a number of differences: unlike TTN where they provide a number of integration options (Cayenne, Data Storage provided by TTN, HTTP integration, IFTTT Maker), KPN only offers HTTP integration. This means you have to provide a destination URL for an HTTPS endpoint where the data is stored. In the Marvin workshop they use Hookbin.com as a free and easy to setup endpoint. But endpoints created there only store data for a limited time. That is why I now use the free version of Loggly.com to collect the data. But of course, the data is only useful if I manage to get it from Loggly to my own local system.

A second difference is a bit of a mystery. If I used the Marvin to send data over the KPN network, the data gets encrypted by the Marvin, but automatically is being decrypted again on the KPN server. But if I use the LoPy to send data over the KPN network, the data shown in the debug console at KPN and the data received by Loggly is still encrypted.

I managed to get both challenges resolved and in this post I’ll do a write-up not of the (lengthy) process of getting to the working code, but of the end result. All code is available on Github.

Lees verder….

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